TSB and HSBC resolve system glitch that locked users out of their accounts

Banking customers of both TSB and HSBC had difficulties accessing their accounts after a glitch in the banks' online systems locked them out.

TSB says that its systems are now almost back to normal after some customers were unable to access their online accounts. HSBC was also hit by similar problems with its mobile banking app though it too now says all operations are back online after the outage.

A spokesperson for TSB apologised to customers affected by the disruption, saying: “We're sorry for any issues our customers experienced. These services are now recovering back to normal levels.”

Users of TSB's smartphone app and online banking services experienced difficulties logging in since around 7:40am on Friday. Around the same time, 50 per cent of HSBC's mobile users were having trouble connecting to its app.

This is just the latest in a string of IT outages across the banking industry, including the recent major IT failure at TSB that led to its chief Paul Pester stepping down.

Sorry for the disruption

Both banks have since apologised to their users though being unable to access one's funds online is not the kind of thing customers can get over quickly.

TSB emphasised that although users were having difficulties with its online banking, “Our cards, branch and telephone services continue to operate as normal.”

A spokesperson for HSBC did their best to reassure customers, saying:

"An earlier issue where some customers were unable to log on to the HSBC mobile banking app has been resolved and users of the app should be able to log on as usual. We will be conducting an investigation into the cause of this issue, and we apologise for any inconvenience this may have caused."

TSB experienced a huge IT meltdown earlier this year that left customers frustrated for weeks and led to the resignation of the bank's chief executive. The bank's customers, many of which are still recovering from previous outages, took to Twitter to vent their anger with the company's online services.

Via BBC

Leave a Reply